© 2016 by Kate Rose Reynolds

Recent Reviews

"Kate Rose Reynolds is the second standout performance in Soul to Keep and, MY GOD, did she steal the show with this one...The way that Kate Rose Reynolds goes from calm and sinisterly collected to intensely terrifying without ever crossing the threshold of scenery chewing is something I haven't witnessed since The Exorcism of Emily Rose. I plan on keeping my eye out for her in future horror films, and I truly hope that the horror community realizes they have a goldmine right in front of them. I'm glad someone finally discovered it."

                 - Soul to Keep review by Preston Holt,                        pophorror.com

"Reynolds seriously explores the mental transformation of her character when she assumes the male persona for protection. Hers is the most insightful Viola of my experience."

                 - Twelfth Night review by Kurt Daw,

                    Shakespeare's Tribe

"Kate Rose Reynolds is marvelous as the shipwrecked, melancholy, and romantic Viola, pretending to be the dutiful pageboy Cesario. Her one role of Viola/Cesario contains two personalities, and she carries it off masterfully."

                 - Twelfth Night review by Rachel Norby,

                    Theatrius

"Reynolds is a fine actor whose physical prowess meets the demands of her role. She is bold, and brassy at the start, but allows her fears and emotions to show as she builds a close relationship with Ruella."

                 - Communicating Doors review by Jenni

                    Prisk, Scene

"Reynolds as Chris makes for a credible teenager, in her surety, arrogance, and her skepticism about her parents and her church ever coming around to acceptance of their love. She really blooms as the adult Chris revisiting this church, who is now much more focused and powerful."

                 - Cardboard Piano review by E.H. Reiter,                       Broadway World

"Reynolds is perfect as Chris: bright, confident, even willing to go up against her family for Adiel."

                 - Cardboard Piano review by Jean                                 Lowerison, San Diego Gay and Lesbian                     News

"As Chris, Kate Rose Reynolds frosted her giddy all-American self-confidence with the apt icing of entitlement."

                 - Cardboard Piano review by Ken                                   Herman, San Diego Story

"Reynolds anchors the piece as a defiant daughter, besotted lover, and justice-seeker. Her emotions run the gamut of joyful to desperate, revengeful to recalcitrant."

                 - Cardboard Piano review by Jenni Prisk,                       Scene

"Reynolds brings a fiery intensity to her broken but determined character."

                 - Cardboard Piano review by James                               Hebert, San Diego Union-Tribune

"Kate Rose Reynolds shines as Horatio...she is clear, passionate and convincing, driving the action.."

                 - Hamlet review by Susan Dunn,                                    Theatrius

"The other standout here is Reynolds, who sublimely brings to the surface Britt's own ethical conflict, ambition, and moral ambiguity. Her pained silences...ring truer than any empirical principles Britt might have espoused on the way to her doctorate. Her cuts are the deepest."

                 Margin of Error review by David L.                               Coddon, San Diego City Beat

"As Britt, Kate Rose Reynolds is particularly skilled at wordlessly embodying her abhorrence not just of Anton's actions but of her own behavior; at times she looks as if she wants to squirm out of her skin."

                 - Margin of Error review by James                                 Hebert, San Diego Union Tribune

"Reynolds is heartbreaking as Britt, especially in the emotionally wrenching scene with Anton that we all know is coming."

                 - Margin of Error review by Jean                                     Lowerison, San Diego Gay and Lesbian                     News

"Reynolds is a welcome return to the San Diego theatre scene."

                 - Margin of Error review by Jenni Prisk,                         Scene